iskander

Moody lines up favourites for Championship


The prospect of another heavy Flemington track doesn’t faze leading trainer Peter Moody who is playing a double hand in the Listed Winter Championship Final.
Three-year-old Doubtful Jack earned his place in the field with a last-start heat win and is adept in any going while emerging star mare Ghostmilk is the stable’s ace should the track deteriorate for Saturday’s 1600m feature.

Flemington was rated a heavy eight on Thursday and with the possibility of showers it could prove ideal conditions for Ghostmilk who did not compete in the series heats but has won her last three starts on badly-affected ground.
moody

“She is in great form and if it is a heavy 10 she is right in it,” Moody said.

The winner of five of his 11 starts, Doubtful Jack is trying for his third win in a row at Flemington and on the strength of his 5-1/2 length heat win over Trustus two weeks ago dominates the TAB Sportsbet market at $2.25 ahead of Ghostmilk at $5.50.

“Both horses are in good shape but to be honest on a slow or better track I can’t see Ghostmilk beating Doubtful Jack,” Moody said.

“He has won his last two by big margins pulling up on wet ground so you can’t say he doesn’t handle affected ground but she grows a leg in the wet and if it does end up being a swamp then she is going to be a good chance.”

Stable rider Luke Nolen will ride Doubtful Jack who gets a lift of 2kg to 55kg while Glen Boss has charge of Ghostmilk who is on the minimum 53kg after wins at Sandown (twice) and Moonee Valley by an aggregate of 7-1/4 lengths at her last three runs.

Moody said Doubtful Jack wasn’t that well placed at the weight scale but has a good opinion of the gelding.

“I thought they were a bit quick to jump him up in the weights against older horses but the way he beat them the other day he deserves his chance,” Moody said.

Moody said Doubtful Jack would most likely have a short break after the Winter Championship and return in the late spring.

He said his performance on Saturday would bring into focus the class of the son of Not A Single Doubt.

“The good thing about him is he goes well on dry tracks as well as the wet and we could look at Perth with him at the end of the year.”